Research leads to a golden discovery for wearable technology

An example of a gold foil peeled from single crystal silicon. Reprinted with permission from Naveen Mahenderkar et al., Science [355]:[1203] (2017)

An example of a gold foil peeled from single crystal silicon. Reprinted with permission from Naveen Mahenderkar et al., Science [355]:[1203] (2017)

Some day, your smartphone might completely conform to your wrist, and when it does, it might be covered in pure gold, thanks to researchers at Missouri S&T.

Writing in the March 17 issue of the journal Science, the S&T researchers say they have developed a way to “grow” thin layers of gold on single crystal wafers of silicon, remove the gold foils, and use them as substrates on which to grow other electronic materials. [Read more…]

Researchers use glass to limit spread of drug-resistant bacteria

Dr. David J. Westenberg in the lab with Megan Ottomeyer, a Missouri S&T graduate who is now in medical school.

As G20 health experts meet this week to discuss the need for new antibiotics to combat drug-resistant bacteria, researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology are looking to an unusual material – glass – to limit the spread of drug-resistant bugs in humans. [Read more…]

Learning for life

Ken Boyko, a former federal government scientist, leads a lab for Remote Sensing Technology in McNutt Hall. Sam O’Keefe/Missouri S&T

Ph.D. student not slowing down after 30-year career as federal government scientist

“The trouble with retirement is you never get a day off.”

Former University of Texas men’s basketball coach Abe Lemons popularized that one-liner in a long-ago interview. Missouri S&T doctoral student Ken Boyko embraces that sentiment to a degree few can hope to match.

At 65, Boyko is preparing to complete a Ph.D. in geological engineering, perhaps as soon as this fall. His research focuses on how LIDAR (light detection and ranging) scanners can be used to “see through” vegetation that might otherwise prevent detection of potential falling rock. The research could enhance safety along highways and bridges and also involved a project for the U.S. Navy, which wants to use the technology as a navigational aid for self-driving off-road vehicles.

[Read more…]

S&T researcher studies next generation phones, cars

Missouri S&T professor Jun Fan works in the semi-anechoic chamber in the Electromagnetic Compatibility lab at Hy-Point. Fan is studying ways to make smartphones faster and more reliable. Sam O’Keefe/Missouri S&T

In 10 years, your cellphone won’t look anything like it does today — at least on the inside. The phones, with 5G technology, will be 10 times faster than they are today. And self-driving cars won’t be a novelty, they will be part of your daily commute.

A Missouri University of Science and Technology researcher is working to make those goals a reality — a safe reality — by deciphering and solving the problems of electromagnetic interference inherent in the systems. Dr. Jun Fan, professor of electrical and computer engineering at Missouri S&T, is using a Google grant to provide real-world solutions. [Read more…]

With Scholars’ Mine, over 1 million served globally

Somewhere on the lower west side of Chicago, an internet user seeking information about photografting – a technique for attaching polymers to surfaces – recently struck gold with a visit to Scholars’ Mine, Missouri University of Science and Technology’s online repository of research papers, creative works and other documents. [Read more…]

Learn locally, act globally

African Ph.D. student works on small-scale mining safety in Ghana

Ph.D. student Kenneth Bansah has formed a nonprofit organization in his native Ghana to improve working conditions for female artisanal miners who do so as means to survival. The mining engineering student is pictured in the Rock Mechanics Explosive Research Center, his campus home. Sam O’Keefe /Missouri S&T

Two boys swim in the Tano River near Ghana's western border with Ivory Coast. Contamination from artisanal mining has rendered the river's water unfit for human consumption. Photo by Kenneth Bansah.

Two boys swim in the Tano River near Ghana’s western border with Ivory Coast. Contamination from artisanal mining has rendered the river’s water unfit for human consumption. Kenneth Bansah.

As a doctoral student in mining engineering, Kenneth Bansah works, learns and lives nearly 10,000 miles from his boyhood home of Tarkwa, Ghana, a gold mining hub in western Africa.

But even as he fine-tunes his dissertation on mitigating sinkhole hazards and other karst formations − and takes care of three children ages four and under while his wife completes her own graduate studies in Michigan – the subsistence gold miners of Ghana are never far from Bansah’s mind.

Or his heart.

[Read more…]

Missouri S&T research team helps Boeing set up nondestructive evaluation laboratory

Researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology recently worked with The Boeing Company to establish a new nondestructive evaluation laboratory that uses millimeter wave technology to improve the detection of potential flaws in coatings, surfaces and materials. [Read more…]

Missouri S&T researcher works to develop nanodiamond materials

Dr. Vadym Mochalin (left) and visiting researcher Atsushi Kume (DAICEL Corp.) working in the lab.

Dr. Vadym Mochalin (left) and visiting researcher Atsushi Kume (DAICEL Corp.) working in the lab.

When you think of diamonds, rings and anniversaries generally come to mind. But one day, the first thing that will come to mind may be bone surgery. By carefully designing modified diamonds at the nano-scale level, a Missouri University of Science and Technology researcher hopes to create multifunctional diamond-based materials for applications ranging from advanced composites to drug delivery platforms and biomedical imaging agents.

[Read more…]

Researchers develop ways to improve machining, milling processes

Jennifer Creamer and Le Ma, both Ph.D. students in mechanical engineering, work in Precision Motion Control Laboratory. Creamer's research on improving the accuracy of machining and milling operations was recently published.

Jennifer Creamer and Le Ma, both Ph.D. students in mechanical engineering, work in Precision Motion Control Laboratory. Creamer’s research on improving the accuracy of machining and milling operations was recently published.

Fixing flaws introduced during the machining of large components used in the aircraft and heavy equipment industries can be time-consuming for manufacturers – and costly if they must scrap the flawed parts after they’ve been fabricated. A new approach developed by researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology is helping manufacturers eliminate those flaws before the parts are created. [Read more…]

S&T researchers suggest ants need work-life balance to survive

fire_ants02As humans, we constantly strive for a good work-life balance. New findings by researchers at Missouri S&T suggest that ants, long perceived as the workaholics of the insect world, do the same.

In fact, according to these researchers, it is imperative that some ants rest while others work to conserve food, energy and resources for the colony. And the larger the colony, the more important this work-rest balance becomes. [Read more…]