Electrical and Computer Engineering

Missouri S&T students, alumni help housebound kids with virtual STEM outreach

Posted by on April 7, 2020

Students from Missouri S&T’s Mars Rover Design Team are adapting their traditional onsite K-12 outreach visits to virtual learning sessions for curious kids who are housebound during coronavirus pandemic school closures.

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Successful transition to online-only courses for S&T faculty and students

Posted by on April 2, 2020

Students and faculty at Missouri S&T are back from spring break and back to meeting virtually after COVID-19 effectively shut down classrooms on the Rolla campus and at the other University of Missouri System universities. The transition to online education has gone fairly smoothly, according to faculty and students.

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Researchers developing coronavirus detection system to screen travelers

Posted by on March 16, 2020

Researchers at Missouri S&T are developing an airborne-biohazard system that could help screeners spot air travelers with lung diseases due to coronavirus and other viruses. Professors in electrical and computer engineering are using machine learning to build a robust system to alert authorities to airborne biohazards as travelers pass through TSA security checkpoints.

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Researchers awarded $2.2 million grant to develop sensors for steelmaking

Posted by on March 13, 2020

Steelmaking involves the handling of corrosive metal and oxide fluids at extremely high temperatures – about 1,600 degrees Celsius, which is several hundred degrees hotter than fresh lava from Mount Kilauea in Hawaii. Measuring the temperature, chemistry and fluid flow of molten steel under these conditions in real time is important to enable rapid responses to the changes in the steel during its production, according to researchers. The U.S. Department of Energy has awarded Missouri S&T part of a $2.2 million grant to develop new, more efficient ways to measure temperature, flow and chemistry during steelmaking to cut costs and improve worker safety.

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Researchers seek to improve hydropower, lower electricity costs

Posted by on January 21, 2020

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded nearly $1 million to a research team led by Missouri University of Science and Technology to study ways to better harness the power of water as an energy source. About 10% of electricity in the U.S. is created by moving water, or hydropower, according to the DOE’s […]

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High-voltage research sparks new Missouri S&T lab

Posted by on December 18, 2019

Research at Missouri S&T could lead to electric cars that can charge in minutes or cost reductions for light-rail transportation in cities where mass transit is vital.

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Missouri S&T professor elected Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors

Posted by on December 3, 2019

Dr. Yihong Qi, adjunct professor of electrical and computer engineering at Missouri S&T, has been named a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, the NAI announced today (Tuesday, Dec. 3).

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Missouri S&T welcomes 19 new faculty members

Posted by on August 14, 2019

With expertise ranging from environmental ethics to internet security and privacy, 19 new and promoted faculty will be welcomed to Missouri S&T this fall.

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New program offers summer research for students from historically black universities

Posted by on July 29, 2019

Six undergraduate students from Tennessee State University in Nashville and Tuskegee University in Tuskegee, Alabama, spent two months this summer conducting engineering research at Missouri University of Science and Technology as part of a new program designed to encourage underrepresented engineering students to consider pursuing graduate studies. The six students took part in Missouri S&T’s […]

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Sensor-embedded ‘smart’ helmets could detect TBIs

Posted by on May 23, 2019

Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are unfortunate occurrences during military training and deployment. Because mild TBIs can be experienced without presenting obvious signs of head trauma or facial lacerations, they are the most difficult type to diagnose at the time of the injury and patients themselves may perceive the impact as mild or harmless. TBIs are cumulative, so treating a patient within the “golden hour” – the first 60 minutes after being injured – is crucial for improved long-term recovery.

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