Graduate students recognized for outstanding research posters

From researching how to make ceramics tough enough for aerospace travel to automated learning strategies and developing fibers for windows and eyewear, research by dozens of Missouri University of Science and Technology graduate students was on display last month. On Monday, March 13, Missouri S&T’s office of graduate studies recognized the top presentations during an awards banquet.

The university’s eighth annual Graduate Fellows Research Poster Session was held Feb. 27 in the Havener Center of Missouri S&T to showcase the research efforts of 48 students who are either Missouri S&T Chancellor’s Fellows or Chancellor’s Distinguished Fellows.

The following five students were recognized for their outstanding research:

  • Leiren Jarvis of Farmington, Missouri, a Ph.D. student in materials science and engineering, won first place for his poster, “Extended Finite Element Modeling of Fracture Behavior of ZrB2-based Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics.” Jarvis is investigating ways to make ultra-high temperature ceramics more fracture resistant for use in aerospace applications.
  • George Shannon of Fenton, Missouri, a Ph.D. student in engineering management and systems engineering, took second for his poster, “Automated Ontology Learning from Text.” Shannon’s research deals with developing new and less expensive approaches to computational intelligence for systems engineering applications.
  • Gregory Taylor of Aviston, Illinois, a Ph.D. student in aerospace engineering, won third place for his poster, “Fabrication of Glass Fiber-Reinforced Transparent Composite for Armor Applications.” Taylor is studying ways to make lightweight, impact-resistant composite glass for use in aircraft canopies, windows and tactical eyewear.
  • Michelle Gegel of Kirkwood, Missouri, a Ph.D. student in mechanical engineering, won honorable mention for her poster, “Closed-Loop Control for Laser Metal Deposition.” Gegel is working on ways to make laser metal deposition additive manufacturing more reliable by identifying problems earlier in the process and taking corrective actions.
  • Jonathan Hill of Jefferson City, Missouri, a master’s student in environmental engineering, also took honorable mention for his poster, “Cloth-Air Partitioning of Oxybenzone.” Hill is studying how clothing attracts semi-volatile organic compound chemicals from the air, which leads to human exposure.

Faculty judges for the morning presentations were Dr. Bonnie Bachman, professor of economics; Dr. Catherine Johnson, assistant professor of mining and nuclear engineering; Dr. Glenn Morrison, professor of environmental engineering; Dr. Gayla Olbricht, assistant professor of mathematics and statistics; Dr. Daniel Reardon, assistant professor of English and technical communication; and Dr. Chaman Sabharwal, professor of computer science.

Faculty judges for the afternoon presentations were Dr. Akim Adekpedjou, associate professor of mathematics and statistics; Dr. Ayodeji Alajo, assistant professor of mining and nuclear engineering; Dr. Douglas Bristow, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering; Dr. Steven Corns, associate professor of engineering management and systems engineering; Dr. Umit Koylu, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering; and Dr. Maciej Zawodniok, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering.

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Comments

  1. Robert J. Webb says:

    MSM-UMR was once a great tech school before 1980’s. now, with soft subjects and degrees, it just another liberal arts infestation.