Laser printing with nanoparticles holds promise for medical research

Dr. Heng Pan, right, works in his lab with graduate student Brandon Ludwig, a co-author of a new research study on a low-cost process to manufacture bioresorbable electronics. Sam O’Keefe/Missouri S&T

Electronic devices that can not only be implanted in the human body but also completely dissolve on their own – known as “bioresorbable” electronics – are envisioned by many as one of medical technology’s next frontiers. A new study by Missouri University of Science and Technology researchers suggests that a laser printing technique using nanoparticles could help unlock a more cost-effective approach to building sturdier and safer components.

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Additive manufacturing: A new twist for stretchable electronics?

New bendable, foldable, twistable electronic devices like the one pictured above could become more common in the future. Photo by John Rogers, University of Illinois, courtesy of the National Science Foundation.

New bendable electronic devices like the one pictured above could become more common in the future. Photo by John Rogers, University of Illinois, courtesy of the National Science Foundation.

Electronic components that can be elongated or twisted – known as “stretchable” electronics – could soon be used to power electronic gadgets, the onboard systems of vehicles, medical devices and other products. And a 3-D printing-like approach to manufacturing may help make stretchable electronics more prevalent, say researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology. [Read more…]