Research leads to a golden discovery for wearable technology

An example of a gold foil peeled from single crystal silicon. Reprinted with permission from Naveen Mahenderkar et al., Science [355]:[1203] (2017)

An example of a gold foil peeled from single crystal silicon. Reprinted with permission from Naveen Mahenderkar et al., Science [355]:[1203] (2017)

Some day, your smartphone might completely conform to your wrist, and when it does, it might be covered in pure gold, thanks to researchers at Missouri S&T.

Writing in the March 17 issue of the journal Science, the S&T researchers say they have developed a way to “grow” thin layers of gold on single crystal wafers of silicon, remove the gold foils, and use them as substrates on which to grow other electronic materials. [Read more…]

S&T sophomore is juggling’s next Michael Phelps

A sophomore in computer engineering at Missouri University of Science and Technology recently won two gold medals — in juggling.

Robert Mosher III captured gold medals in solo
ball bouncing and duo ball bounce passing during the International Jugglers
Association’s annual Juggling Festival. The festival was held in July at the
Lexington (Ky.) Convention Center.

In the solo event, Mosher broke his own IJA
record by juggling 10 balls with 31 catches. In the duo event, Mosher and
Christian Kloc of Frederick, Md., earned the gold medal by combining to make 62
catches with 15 balls.

Mosher, 19, currently holds the world record
for solo ball bouncing. On Dec. 10, 2007, Mosher successfully juggled 10 balls
and had 39 catches. The record breaking attempt, which occurred in the laundry
room of a residence hall on the Missouri S&T campus, was recorded on
video
.

“Since I started juggling, my goal was always
to break a world record,” says Mosher. “I now have my eyes on the seven ball
force bounce record of 196 catches. I actually beat that record in a practice
session at this year’s juggling festival, but it isn’t official because I
didn’t videotape it or do it in front of judges.”

A graduate of Goddard High School in Wichita,
Kan., Mosher started juggling as a hobby less than three years ago after he
came across videos of people juggling on the Internet. Now, to stay sharp, he
practices for hours every week.

More information about the IJA competition is
available at http://www.juggle.org/ .