S&T researcher studies next generation phones, cars

Missouri S&T professor Jun Fan works in the semi-anechoic chamber in the Electromagnetic Compatibility lab at Hy-Point. Fan is studying ways to make smartphones faster and more reliable. Sam O’Keefe/Missouri S&T

In 10 years, your cellphone won’t look anything like it does today — at least on the inside. The phones, with 5G technology, will be 10 times faster than they are today. And self-driving cars won’t be a novelty, they will be part of your daily commute.

A Missouri University of Science and Technology researcher is working to make those goals a reality — a safe reality — by deciphering and solving the problems of electromagnetic interference inherent in the systems. Dr. Jun Fan, professor of electrical and computer engineering at Missouri S&T, is using a Google grant to provide real-world solutions. [Read more…]

Learn locally, act globally

African Ph.D. student works on small-scale mining safety in Ghana

Ph.D. student Kenneth Bansah has formed a nonprofit organization in his native Ghana to improve working conditions for female artisanal miners who do so as means to survival. The mining engineering student is pictured in the Rock Mechanics Explosive Research Center, his campus home. Sam O’Keefe /Missouri S&T

Ph.D. student Kenneth Bansah has formed a nonprofit organization in his native Ghana to improve working conditions for female artisanal miners who do so as means to survival. The mining engineering student is pictured in the Rock Mechanics Explosive Research Center, his campus home. Sam O’Keefe /Missouri S&T

Two boys swim in the Tano River near Ghana's western border with Ivory Coast. Contamination from artisanal mining has rendered the river's water unfit for human consumption. Photo by Kenneth Bansah.

Two boys swim in the Tano River near Ghana’s western border with Ivory Coast. Contamination from artisanal mining has rendered the river’s water unfit for human consumption. Kenneth Bansah.

As a doctoral student in mining engineering, Kenneth Bansah works, learns and lives nearly 10,000 miles from his boyhood home of Tarkwa, Ghana, a gold mining hub in western Africa.

But even as he fine-tunes his dissertation on mitigating sinkhole hazards and other karst formations − and takes care of three children ages four and under while his wife completes her own graduate studies in Michigan – the subsistence gold miners of Ghana are never far from Bansah’s mind.

Or his heart.

[Read more…]

Missouri S&T research team helps Boeing set up nondestructive evaluation laboratory

Researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology recently worked with The Boeing Company to establish a new nondestructive evaluation laboratory that uses millimeter wave technology to improve the detection of potential flaws in coatings, surfaces and materials. [Read more…]

Smith elected treasurer of national chemical engineering organization

Dr. Joseph Smith, the Wayne and Gayle Laufer Chair of Energy at Missouri University of Science and Technology, has been elected treasurer of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

As an officer, Smith will help guide the national organization that has over 50,000 worldwide members. In December, he finished a three-year term as a member of AIChE’s board of directors before being picked to be treasurer, where he will serve as chair of the finance committee and as a member of the executive committee. [Read more…]

Robotics expert to speak about robots that teach

There are robots to sweep your floors and robots to sort packages at warehouse giants. But a Yale University professor says robots can do much more than just interact with people on a physical level — they can interact more personally, providing cues to guide social behavior.

Dr. Brian Scassellati, professor of computer science, cognitive science and mechanical engineering at Yale and direc¬tor of the National Science Foundation Expedition on Socially Assistive Robotics, will visit Missouri University of Science and Technology on Feb. 6 to deliver a lecture titled “Building Robots That Teach.” [Read more…]

Researchers develop ways to improve machining, milling processes

Jennifer Creamer and Le Ma, both Ph.D. students in mechanical engineering, work in Precision Motion Control Laboratory. Creamer's research on improving the accuracy of machining and milling operations was recently published.

Jennifer Creamer and Le Ma, both Ph.D. students in mechanical engineering, work in Precision Motion Control Laboratory. Creamer’s research on improving the accuracy of machining and milling operations was recently published.

Fixing flaws introduced during the machining of large components used in the aircraft and heavy equipment industries can be time-consuming for manufacturers – and costly if they must scrap the flawed parts after they’ve been fabricated. A new approach developed by researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology is helping manufacturers eliminate those flaws before the parts are created. [Read more…]

Fix-it fixation

Alumni couple finds success with furniture restoration business

Nicole Genz demonstrates how to refurbish cabinet doors during a Saturday morning class. Photos by Sam O'Keefe/Missouri S&T.

Nicole Genz demonstrates how to refurbish cabinet doors during a Saturday morning class. Photos by Sam O’Keefe/Missouri S&T.

By Alan Scher Zagier

As Missouri S&T undergraduates a decade ago, Brandt and Nicole Genz never envisioned careers as small-business owners flourishing amid the 21st century version of the Arts and Crafts Movement.

But after earning engineering degrees in Rolla, the St. Louis couple is now carving out an unexpected expertise in the home design market as the creative and managerial forces behind Rescued Furnishings and Designs. Their business began as a basement hobby and now consists of a workshop, new retail showroom and thriving do-it-yourself space occupying 6,600 square feet in a historic building near Lafayette Square.

[Read more…]

Additive manufacturing: A new twist for stretchable electronics?

New bendable, foldable, twistable electronic devices like the one pictured above could become more common in the future. Photo by John Rogers, University of Illinois, courtesy of the National Science Foundation.

New bendable electronic devices like the one pictured above could become more common in the future. Photo by John Rogers, University of Illinois, courtesy of the National Science Foundation.

Electronic components that can be elongated or twisted – known as “stretchable” electronics – could soon be used to power electronic gadgets, the onboard systems of vehicles, medical devices and other products. And a 3-D printing-like approach to manufacturing may help make stretchable electronics more prevalent, say researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology. [Read more…]

A recipe for success

inside-story

Photography by Karen Drinkwater.

Baking industry niche leads graduate to Clif Bar boardroom

Growing up in suburban St. Louis, Rich Berger’s career aspirations were far from singular. [Read more…]

Missouri S&T honors alumni for professional distinction

Missouri University of Science and Technology presented two Awards of Professional Distinction during winter commencement ceremonies held Saturday, Dec. 17. The awards recognize the outstanding Missouri S&T graduates for professional achievement. [Read more…]