With Scholars’ Mine, over 1 million served globally

Somewhere on the lower west side of Chicago, an internet user seeking information about photografting – a technique for attaching polymers to surfaces – recently struck gold with a visit to Scholars’ Mine, Missouri University of Science and Technology’s online repository of research papers, creative works and other documents. [Read more…]

Missouri S&T research team helps Boeing set up nondestructive evaluation laboratory

Researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology recently worked with The Boeing Company to establish a new nondestructive evaluation laboratory that uses millimeter wave technology to improve the detection of potential flaws in coatings, surfaces and materials. [Read more…]

Miner League Theatre Players to perform ‘Almost, Maine’

The Leach Theatre light pole banners and environmental graphics with the Miners Dig Deeper branding. Sam O'Keefe/Missouri S&T

The Black Box Theatre is located in Castleman Hall, 10th and Main streets. Sam O’Keefe/Missouri S&T

The Miner League Theatre Players at Missouri University of Science and Technology will perform “Almost, Maine” by John Coriani this month. [Read more…]

Statement from Chancellor Schrader regarding Gov. Greitens’ budget

Dr. Cheryl B. Schrader, chancellor of Missouri University of Science and Technology, issued the following statement today in response to Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens’ proposed budget for the state of Missouri: [Read more…]

Mumps case confirmed at Missouri S&T

Student health officials at Missouri University of Science and Technology have confirmed that a Missouri S&T student has contracted mumps. [Read more…]

Statement regarding presidential executive order temporarily banning citizens from seven countries from entering the U.S.

At 5 p.m. today (Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017), Missouri S&T Chancellor Cheryl B. Schrader issued the following statement regarding the recent presidential executive order to temporarily ban immigrants and refugees from seven countries from entering the United States: [Read more…]

Missouri S&T chancellor named to NCAA Division II Presidents Council

Missouri S&T Chancellor Cheryl B. Schrader

Missouri S&T Chancellor Cheryl B. Schrader

Dr. Cheryl B. Schrader, chancellor of Missouri University of Science and Technology, has been selected to serve as a representative to the NCAA Division II Presidents Council, the organization’s highest governance office. [Read more…]

Researchers develop ways to improve machining, milling processes

Jennifer Creamer and Le Ma, both Ph.D. students in mechanical engineering, work in Precision Motion Control Laboratory. Creamer's research on improving the accuracy of machining and milling operations was recently published.

Jennifer Creamer and Le Ma, both Ph.D. students in mechanical engineering, work in Precision Motion Control Laboratory. Creamer’s research on improving the accuracy of machining and milling operations was recently published.

Fixing flaws introduced during the machining of large components used in the aircraft and heavy equipment industries can be time-consuming for manufacturers – and costly if they must scrap the flawed parts after they’ve been fabricated. A new approach developed by researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology is helping manufacturers eliminate those flaws before the parts are created. [Read more…]

Missouri S&T campus to close due to winter weather

For the latest about the weather situation and its impact on campus, check alert.mst.edu.

Due to potentially hazardous winter weather conditions, the Missouri University of Science and Technology campus will be closed Friday, Jan. 13. Only employees who are considered situationally critical should report to work on Friday. [Read more…]

Additive manufacturing: A new twist for stretchable electronics?

New bendable, foldable, twistable electronic devices like the one pictured above could become more common in the future. Photo by John Rogers, University of Illinois, courtesy of the National Science Foundation.

New bendable electronic devices like the one pictured above could become more common in the future. Photo by John Rogers, University of Illinois, courtesy of the National Science Foundation.

Electronic components that can be elongated or twisted – known as “stretchable” electronics – could soon be used to power electronic gadgets, the onboard systems of vehicles, medical devices and other products. And a 3-D printing-like approach to manufacturing may help make stretchable electronics more prevalent, say researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology. [Read more…]