Archives for August 31, 2016

Prevention with a capital ‘P’

Cancer-detection device poised to save lives

Dr. Yinfa Ma, Curators' Distinguished Teaching Professor of chemistry, works with Ph.D. student Casey Burton and Alex Cristea, a sophomore in chemistry, on Ma's P-scan cancer-screening device.              Photo by Sam O'Keefe/Missouri S&T

Dr. Yinfa Ma, Curators’ Distinguished Teaching Professor of chemistry, discusses his P-Scan device with Alex Cristea (left), a sophomore in chemistry, and Casey Burton (right), a Ph.D. student in chemistry. Photo by Sam O’Keefe/Missouri S&T

The early detection of cancer through screening techniques such as mammograms saves thousands of lives annually. Yinfa Ma is out to save thousands more through an easier and less costly approach. [Read more…]

‘Care Chair’ helps detect patients’ movements, mental state

Debraj De, a postdoctoral fellow at Missouri S&T, and S&T professor Sajal Das developed a chair that could help detect the daily behavior and mental health of elderly people at home or in assisted-living facilities — specifically rehabilitation patients and elderly people susceptible to levels of dementia.                   Photo By Sam O'Keefe/Missouri S&T

Debraj De, a postdoctoral fellow at Missouri S&T, and S&T professor Sajal Das developed a chair sensor device that can detect a person’s daily behavior — and their mental state. Photo By Sam O’Keefe/Missouri S&T

The utilitarian chair. Its simple structure and function haven’t changed in millennia. But researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology have made the humble chair a portal into not only a person’s movements, but also their mental state.

Dr. Debraj De, a postdoctoral fellow at Missouri S&T, and Dr. Sajal K. Das, the Daniel St. Clair Endowed Chair and department chair of computer science at Missouri S&T, have developed a chair that could help detect the daily behavior and mental health of elderly people at home or in assisted-living facilities — specifically rehabilitation patients and elderly people susceptible to levels of dementia.  The “Care Chair” employs sensors to detect a user’s functional and emotion-based activities throughout a normal day. The device, which uses four sensors, slips over a chair’s backrest and back so that it’s unobtrusive. [Read more…]